Sustainuary Concludes with a Showcase of Student Creations at Trashion Show

Student Council hosted the 13th annual Trashion Show in an effort to promote eco-friendliness and recycling as a culmination of Sustainuary, the month-long initiative to bring awareness to the student body about sustainability, this past Thursday.

Student Council hosted the 13th annual Trashion Show in an effort to promote eco-friendliness and recycling as a culmination of Sustainuary, the month-long initiative to bring awareness to the student body about sustainability, this past Thursday.

Students from each House created an outfit entirely out of waste, which was to be presented to the school community on a model during school meeting. This year’s winner was the Kirby House, whose outfit was modeled by Reghan Funderburk ’20 and designed by Oona Pierre ’20, followed by the Stanley House and the Woodhull House in second and third place, respectively.

Alexis Valadez ’20 designed the Woodhull House’s third place outfit, which had a red-and-brown paint scheme and was inspired by the House motto ‘rise from the ashes’ and the House symbol, a phoenix. The costume itself was comprised of two sections, namely the mask and beak and the wings.

“The beak had a contraption in it that allowed it to open and close, and the mask was custom-fit to the model’s head [...] The wings themselves were more technical. We started off with a flat piece of canvas material, and over that we put paper plates to add structure. Following that, we tied the paper plates together [...] and then put colored napkins to represent the feathers of the phoenix,” Valadez said regarding the structure of the Woodhull costume.

Laura French ’21, who designed the Stanley House’s outfit, started with concept sketches in order to get a basic layout of the costume. Subsequently, she picked textures and colors with which she wanted to work and then assembled the costume. French noted that the most challenging part was “working with the materials themselves,” as she thought that the assembly would be more or less intuitive.

“Newspaper does not behave like fabric, so we had to deal with torn paper, staples, and everything falling apart. At one point we had to scrap the design entirely and starch from scratch because nothing was holding together,” French said.

The Kirby House’s winning outfit was designed by Oona Pierre ’20, who said that the inspiration behind the dress was “a southern belle” look. Though Pierre began making the corset of the dress almost three weeks ago, “it was really satisfying to get [the corset] right because [Pierre] did not know it would work out when [she] started building it.”

Like French, the most difficult part of the process was “getting paper to fold like fabric” for Pierre.

Student Council Arts Representative and host for the Trashion Show Toby Ilogu ’19 thought that the show “went pretty well, [...] [even though] there were some rough patches on the technical side.”

“We saw some great designs from the Circle, the Crescent, and the two Lower Houses,” Ilogu said.