Hey Lawrence, Welcome to My Crib

Halle Rose’s ’20 room in Stanley House stands out from the rest. Rose has always designed her room using a color scheme. Her II Form and III Form year she centered her room around the color blue, and this year, Rose decided to base her room design around pink. Rose chose this color because it was a “lively color” and would provide a conducive environment for work.

Halle Rose ’20

Halle Rose’s ’20 room in Stanley House stands out from the rest. Rose has always designed her room using a color scheme. Her II Form and III Form year she centered her room around the color blue, and this year, Rose decided to base her room design around pink. Rose chose this color because it was a “lively color” and would provide a conducive environment for work.

Rose’s minimalistic setup—which includes pink accents and a few gold highlights from items scattered around the room—helps give the space a welcoming feel. Rose describes her room as a “fun [environment] but also […] sophisticated.” She chose a minimalistic approach due to the fact that she did not want to be overwhelmed with too much in her room “but [also] didn’t want to get bored.”

Rose decided to keep her white and pink bedding simple so she could highlight the decor accents on her wall. Her pink and grey throw pillows and a grey throw blanket complement her bedding.

Rose also has a white fur rug covering floor and a cream mini futon. Near Rose’s drawers she has a gold mirror, white jewelry organizers, white lanterns on gold, floating shelves, and a poster of pink lips.

Rose’s favorite part of her room is the corner near her bed because, “it has enough going on but its still relaxed.” Above her headboard, Rose has gold-accented mirrors, and on the other side of the corner, Rose put mini-pastel pink posters of a beach stand, palm trees, mountains, golden speckles, and glass bottles. Her room includes a grey headboard with gold studs from Target, a white lamp from Wayfair, a whiteboard from Pottery Born, Vogue pictures she bought in the city, and paintings done by Julia Davis ’19.

When first designing her room for this year, Rose found it difficult to coordinate her entire room because, “when you’re ordering things online it’s hard to see what will look good.” For Rose, “figuring out what would be a good balance […] and laying [her furniture] out” also added to the challenge.

Thacher Smith ’20

Thacher Smith ’20 lives on the third floor of the Hamill House. He chose a small room because it has two windows which provide nice views of the Hamill porch and Boys Upper. As a result, the room has a “compact, minimalist design.”

The room is centered around the projector installed on the back wall, projecting onto the opposing wall across the room. Smith said, “This setup gives me a big screen without a TV which is too bulky.” A long gray sofa sits along the back wall and the bed lies beneath the projector screen. In the front left corner of the room, a standard office chair is tucked under a desk which holds a monitor, keyboard, and a lamp. Smith said, “It’s fairly simple because its a place where I can work without distractions.”

He keeps a fresh plant on a nightstand between the desk and bed because it “enhances the artistic energy of the room.” The live screensavers of his projector are aerial shots of global cities. In the spare space of the walls, Smith hangs maps of places he’s traveled to, banners of summer camps he’s worked at, and a flag of his hometown the District of Columbia. These “aesthetically pleasing” things remind Smith of “places that make [him] happy.” As an artist and videographer, he hoped the items would give him “creativity when thinking”.

The dresser and fridge occupy the space between the two windows along the left wall. Smith keeps his photography and film equipment laid out on top of the dresser so he’s always “ready to go.” He lined strip lights along the ceiling’s perimeter, setting them to warm colors which help him “sleep better.”

Smith designed his room to serve not only as a bedroom but also an “office, living room, and entertainment area.” Especially since he gets frequent visits from friends, he’s “glad that [his room] is a true community space and a resource to the House.”

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