David Hernandez '19: Exploring Music and Theatre

One of the most familiar faces on campus, David Hernandez ’19 is well-known for his involvement in the performing arts at Lawrenceville. However, what most are often unfamiliar with is his Periwig journey and how he has grown to immerse himself within the artistic community.

One of the most familiar faces on campus, David Hernandez ’19 is well-known for his involvement in the performing arts at Lawrenceville. However, what most are often unfamiliar with is his Periwig journey and how he has grown to immerse himself within the artistic community.

Since he was young, Hernandez’s parents instilled a love for music in him. His father, along with a group of friends, would sing Colombian folk music in their spare time, which became Hernandez’s first exposure to vocal music. His parents also fostered a creative learning environment in which he could develop a sense of musicality and, consequently, music became a critical element in his life. “When I was a baby, [my dad] would blast music in the house. Music is just something I always want to be attached with,” Hernandez said.

Hernandez learned to play the piano and the guitar at a young age and continued pursuing those instruments in middle school. However, he never played those instruments at a particularly high-level, and his involvement with music did not reach “beyond [his] mom’s cooking or [his] dad’s playlist while working.” He was a member of the tech team at his middle school but did not participate in any form of acting, singing, or dancing.

On the contrary, after coming to Lawrenceville, his innate passion for performing arts prompted him to become a thespian. Hernandez’s first artistic feature was in Winterfest as a III Former, where he played a supporting role from Woody Allen’s God; Hernandez went on to perform in Frederick Stroppel’s Judgement Call as a IV Former and played Officer Barrel in this year’s Fall Musical, Urinetown. He currently serves as a co-President of Impulse, Lawrenceville’s student-run comedy troupe, and will play Shakes Speare, the witty detective male lead in Tim Kelly’s The Omelet Murder Case: A Murderous Spoof in One Act for Winterfest 2019. Furthermore, Hernandez also performed a duet with Lily Vore ’19 in the School’s 2018 Spring Dance Concert and is a member of Lawrenceville’s select choir group, The Lawrentians.

“Before I dipped my toes in any kind of performing arts, I liked seeing people who [were] happy and enjoyed making people laugh and making people smile. I guess it took me awhile to realize that performing arts is a good outlet for me to make people happy,” Hernandez said. He later added that before coming to Lawrenceville, he never thought that personifying a character on stage was the one aspect of his life in which he would want to explore more. Once Hernandez “realized that [he] was really liking the acting, [he] decided to keep going for it.” He hopes to study music theory in college.

Despite his many artistic involvements on campus, Hernandez had never considered auditioning or participating in the School’s annual musical prior to Urinetown. However, after undergoing many theatrical successes through Winterfest and seeing his close friends pursue their passion in theatre, Hernandez was inspired to do more.

“I am very lucky to have close friends who constantly pushed me to try new things [and] to be apart of such an amazing performing arts community. I know [they] won’t be judgemental and criticize me for what I do, and I can come [into rehearsal] and experiment with different things,” Hernandez said. “It’s unique. You don’t always get the opportunity to let your creative fervor all out. The most important thing that I’ve learned from performing arts is a sense of community and how everyone really appreciates communal involvement and original ideas.”