David Prilutsky '21 Competes for Team USA

Ranked 25th in the country, David Prilutsky ’21 has been the starting foilist and a member of Lawrenceville’s Varsity Fencing team since his II Form year. He has maintained an undefeated record throughout his two seasons of high school fencing and contributed to Big Red foil team’s second place win in this year’s Cetrulo Fencing Tournament.

Ranked 25th in the country, David Prilutsky ’21 has been the starting foilist and a member of Lawrenceville’s Varsity Fencing team since his II Form year. He has maintained an undefeated record throughout his two seasons of high school fencing and contributed to Big Red foil team’s second place win in this year’s Cetrulo Fencing Tournament.

Prilutsky began fencing at the Princeton University Fencing Club, participating in North American Cup Tournaments (NACs) when he was just eight years old. With the help of his coach, former Olympian Tamer Tahoun, his passion for fencing has grown. Every weekday, after practicing and competing with Lawrenceville’s varsity team, Prilutsky trains for an additional two hours at Premier Fencing Club. On Saturdays, he trains for three and a half hours at the Fencers Club in Manhattan. “Fencing is a lot about distance and timing,” he said.

In addition to fencing at lawrenceville, Prilutsky fenced on Team USA at the World Cup in France this past summer, qualified for another World Cup this year, and will be attending the Junior Olympic Fencing Championships in Colorado next week. Based on the results from National Competitions, he was one of 20 fencers selected for Team USA. “Going to that first World Cup was a really [rewarding] experience,” Prilutsky said. “I got to see how people from other countries fence, meet new people, [and] bond with Team USA.”

Despite his numerous successes and accolades, Prilutsky always goes “one touch at a time” and remembers to “go in with confidence and never give up” during a bout. “One time at an NAC, I was losing 2 to 12,” he said. “My coach talked to me [and] told me to keep fighting, and [...] I came back and won 15 to 12.”

Prilutsky looks forward to the remainder of this fencing season both for Big Red and on the world stage. “[Fencing is] a great way to [...] make new friends from all over the world. Although intense and close bouts can get stressful with everyone watching, sometimes the pressure brings out the best in me,” he said. “And the celebration right after a tough win is a great feeling—you get to scream and rejoice with your coach and all of your friends.”