Lawrenceville Remembers 9/11 Victims

This past Wednesday, the Lawrenceville community gathered to remember the lives that were lost to the attacks on September 11, 2001.

This past Wednesday, the Lawrenceville community gathered to remember the lives that were lost to the attacks on September 11, 2001.

Over 100 students and faculty gathered around the peace pole to the ringing of the Edith Memorial Chapel bells as School Chaplain and Religious Master Sue Anne Steffey Morrow H’12 spoke about loss. “Many of us knew someone who was in one tower or the other,” she said. “For some of you, it is history, [...] [but] all of us have been changed by the events of 9/11.” Morrow reflected on how the events that unfolded that day have made people across the globe more aware of the complexity of religion and the dangers of extremism. She urged community members to reflect on the loss that occurred to become “more determined to understand one another and to work toward the common good.”

After a moment of silence, Head Master Stephen Murray H'54 '55 '65 '16 P'16 '21 read the poem “The Dead of September 11” by Toni Morrison.

Student Council members then read the names of the seven members of the Lawrenceville community who died during the attacks to honor their memory. They are Michael Phillip ’63, Charles McCrann’64, Richard Stewart Jr. ’85, Keith Coleman ’86, Scott Coleman ’89 Jonathan Connors P ’02, and Catherine Chirls P ’03.

“[The names] made me realize how many people in the community were affected,” said Kate Dillard ’22. “It was very moving.”

Morrow then read aloud the words on the memorial plaque in the Edith Memorial Chapel to offer another moment of reflection: “May noble thought and deed defend thee to the last.” As the gathering came to a close, the Edith Memorial Chapel bells rang to the tune of “You’ll Never Walk Alone,” a song centered on hope and resilience.

Kate McCann ’22 said, “ I think [the gathering] helped us to be grateful for what we have, [...] [especially regarding] our community and Lawrenceville in general.”

“Most of us were not born when it happened, so it’s easy to forget,” Dillard added. “[Remembering] helps keep the memory alive and keeps us thankful.”

Even as an international student, Jovana Jovic ’22 saw the assembly as crucial “not just because [many lost] were part of the Lawrenceville community, but [also] because they were human. Even internationally, [9/11] was a big tragedy and is important to remember,” Jovic said.

Morrow believes that, especially at a place such as Lawrenceville which includes students and faculty members from all over the world, such a ceremony “gives us the opportunity to deepen our understanding of diversity [and] equity [...] and to stand up against hate.”

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