Sustainability Council Hosts Annual Trashion Show

This past Thursday at 1:30 PM, the Sustainability Council hosted its annual Trashion Show live on a virtual Zoom webinar as part of a month-long initiative to raise environmental awareness at Lawrenceville.

This past Thursday at 1:30 PM, the Sustainability Council hosted its annual Trashion Show live on a virtual Zoom webinar as part of a month-long initiative to raise environmental awareness at Lawrenceville.

A panel of faculty judges consisting of Chinese Teacher Yanhong Zhang, French Teacher Brian Jacobs, Arts Department Director of Design and Fabrication Rex Brodie, English Teacher Sujin Seo, and Mathematics Teacher Arden Rossi judged Circle and Crescent representatives on outfits made entirely out of recyclable material. In order to accommodate the various time zones students live in, this year’s Trashion Show was a combination of live performances as well as previously prepared slide presentations.

This year’s champion was the Stanley House, whose recyclable clothing was modeled by III Formers Lily Gessner, Maddy Laws, and Maddie Rygh. The outfit featured a two-part dress consisting of a top made out of packaging papers from boxes and a skirt made from stitched Introduction to Chemistry and Physics (ICPS) homework. The designers also used materials from a water bottle, a Chinese test, and straps knit together around a chain to construct the accessories and jewelry.

Griswold House and Kirby House came in second place, followed by the McClellan House and Kennedy House in third place.

Despite the changes made due to remote learning, Student Council Sustainability Representative Maia Hawkins-Litvin ’21 still believed that this year’s Trashion Show “was a rather seamless transition.”

“Most of the roles [in the preparation process] have remained the same. We had a group within the Sustainuary Council specifically designed to tackle Sustainuary planning events for this month...They designated faculty members to judge the competition and set up the panel,” she explained. According to Hawkins-Litvin, the greatest difficulty in planning, however, was the “inability to get a direct line of communication [between the Houses]. As a result, a lot of things got lost in translation. A lot of people didn’t know what was going on or how things were being presented.”

Stephens House Sustainability Representative Carina Li ’22 believed that this year’s design process changed drastically from years past. “It’s more of a collaborative process this year especially because we’re all separated,” she said. On the creation process, she said, “Because not everyone [had] the same materials to make one outfit, different people [were] making different parts of an outfit together. Unlike past years, where only one person designed an outfit, everyone who volunteered was equally involved in coming up with designs.”

Due to the distance, Li considered communication to be the biggest challenge in the preparation process, saying, “We were not able to collaborate super well, so we did our best to make it look coordinated like it’s one outfit, but it was definitely hard working on that.”

Reflecting on seeing the designs of the other Houses, Li concluded, “Everyone worked on their designs separately, [so] we had a diversity of materials and styles because everyone’s made a separate piece. This year, it definitely opened up opportunities for a lot of different designs to be used...It was inspiring to see how people were still caring about sustainability despite us being virtual.”

Comments

There are 0 comments for this article

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.